Can I See My Children At Christmas?

Christmas is supposed to be an exciting time for families, but sometimes, it’s quite the opposite.

We're rated 4.8
on
By Claudia Price - 9th November 2021

Family Law Solicitor, Claudia Price, addresses the difficulties that separated parents face at Christmas and offers guidance on reaching an agreement.

Christmas is supposed to be an exciting time for families, but sometimes, it’s quite the opposite. Many separated parents face the annual struggle of attempting to agree the arrangements for the children over the festive period. We receive many new enquiries in the run up to the Christmas from worried parents who are concerned about spending Christmas without their children.

It’s important that the arrangements are discussed at the earliest opportunity. That way, plans can be made and the children can write to Santa to let him know where they will be. It is also important to leave plenty of time, should discussions take longer than anticipated.

Get in touch with our experts today for free, no obligation legal advice


Request a Callback

It’s entirely understandable that both parents want to spend time with their children on Christmas Day. However, try to remember that any arrangements should be made with the children’s best interests in mind. Many families enjoy alternate Christmas’ or a shared Christmas (whereby the children may spend the morning with one parent and the afternoon with the other). It all depends on what is best for the children.

Sorting out the arrangements can be a lengthy process. If parents are unable to agree, an application to the Court may be the last resort.

Get in touch with our experts today for free, no obligation legal advice


Request a Callback

What options are available to me?

If you’re currently trying to negotiate Christmas plans for your children, we recommend that you:

  1. Try communication

Communication between parents is key whether this be face to face, via telephone, text message or even email. Being able to reach an agreement between parents promotes positive co-parenting and can save both parents time and stress! However, it is important that the children are not privy to any discussions.

  1. Attend mediation

If direct communication between parents breaks down, mediation should be the next step. A mediator can guide discussions and provide sensible suggestions.

  1. Consult a solicitor

If parents are unable to reach agreement, you may want to speak to a solicitor. Here at Aticus Law, we advise clients on their individual circumstances and consider the practical arrangements as well as the emotional impact.

It is vital that the arrangements are fair and in the best interests of the children. This is the approach the Court will take, should an application need to be issued. 

  1. Apply to the Court for a Child Arrangements Order

This is usually the last resort for most parents, as taking action through the courts means lengthy delays and more legal fees. Unfortunately, in some cases, Children Act proceedings are the only option.

Get in touch with our experts today for free, no obligation legal advice


Request a Callback

Advice for Parents:

  • Plan early;
  • Be flexible;
  • Think of the children’s best interests;
  • Compromise;

Speak to our family law solicitors

Addressing arrangements over the Christmas period can sometimes be one of many issues that are bubbling on the surface. Our experts will be happy to discuss your circumstances with you ahead of the festive period in the hope of reaching an amicable agreement with your former partner. Call us today!

Get in touch with our experts today for free, no obligation legal advice


Request a Callback

Call or email us in order for us to discuss in greater detail how our solicitors can move your case forward today.

Book a Consultation

Contact us today to talk about your situation

    We're rated 4.8
    on
    Online Chat